Tag Archives: Ironman

The leaders in the 2017 Ironman World Championship approach Hawi.

2017 Ironman World Championship

The leaders in the 2017 Ironman World Championship approach Hawi.Bike pedals at 2017 Ironman World Championship.Lionel Sanders competes in the 2017 Ironman World Championship.Bentley Walker competes in the 2017 Ironman World Championship.

Yesterday was the Ironman World Championship race on the island. The race, comprising of a 2 mile swim, a 110 mile bike ride, and a running marathon, starts and ends in Kailua Kona. I usually check in with the race in the vicinity of the bike leg turnaround at Hawi.

Top: The race leaders head up the hill toward the turnaround, accompanied by support vehicles, race marshals, and cameramen.

Above: Lionel Sanders of Canada led the race at this point, but lost the lead before he got back to this spot on the return journey. However, he retook the lead later and only lost it a couple of miles from the marathon finish, to Patrick Lange of Germany.

Right above: Pumping the pedals is hard work, but can be colorful.

Right below: Bentley Walker of the United States digs deep approaching the turnaround at Hawi.

Bottom: Like Sanders, Lucy Charles of Great Britain led the women’s race heading toward Hawi, but she, too, ultimately finished second, behind Daniela Ryf of Switzerland. Charles and Lauren Brandon of the United States were well clear of the rest of the women’s field at this point.

The leaders in the women's race in 2017 Ironman World Championship approach Hawi.

Sign seen during the IRONMAN world championship on the Big Island.

Signs: Have mercy

Sign seen during the IRONMAN world championship on the Big Island.
I enjoyed the message in front of the local Catholic church during the recent IRONMAN race, which is a decidedly merciless event consisting of a 2.4 mile open-water swim, a 112 mile bike ride, and a marathon run. Looks like someone might be about to have a problem with his bike chain, too.

For more information about IRONMAN, go to Ironman.com.

IRONMAN competitors pull over to wait out time penalties they’ve been given by race marshals

IRONMAN wrap

IRONMAN competitors pull over to wait out time penalties they’ve been given by race marshalsA support person carries spare wheels at the IRONMAN world championship on the Big Island.
A final few photos from last weekend’s IRONMAN world championship here on the Big Island.

Above, competitors pull over to wait out time penalties they’ve been given by race marshals. For cyclists, the violations are usually drafting violations.

At left, one of my favorite IRONMAN participants, the wheeler-dealer. I like to think this support guy rides the course shouting, “Wheels, we got wheels. Get your wheels here.” Sadly, every time I’ve seen him, he’s always been very quiet and with this same inscrutable expression.

Below, a rider whizzes past tropical foliage on the way out of Hawi.

For more information about IRONMAN, go to Ironman.com.

An IRONMAN rider whizzes past tropical foliage on the way out of Hawi

Michael Weiss of Austria and Tim O'Donnell of the U.S.A. take on water at the IRONMAN world championship

IRONMAN feeding frenzy

Michael Weiss of Austria and Tim O'Donnell of the U.S.A. take on water at the IRONMAN world championshipFood bags ready for distribution at the IRONMAN world championship
Nutrition and hydration are key elements for IRONMAN competitors. There are aid stations at regular intervals along the course and at some of these it’s possible to stash a goody bag of personal favorites (within legal limits of course). The photo at right shows these bags arranged by number, ready for distribution.

Most of the competitors will have to stop to pick up their bags, but the professionals, going through first, will (hopefully) be handed theirs while on the move. The photos below show Camilla Pedersen of Denmark receiving her bag from one of the IRONMAN volunteers.

In the top photo, Michael Weiss of Austria and Tim O’Donnell of the U.S.A. show they’re ready should the IRONMAN organizers decide to award bonus points for synchronized water bottle use.

For more information about IRONMAN, go to Ironman.com.

Camilla Pedersen of Denmark receiving her bag from one of the Ironman volunteersCamilla Pedersen of Denmark receiving her bag from one of the Ironman volunteers

Daniela Ryf of Switzerland powers out of Hawi at IRONMAN 2016

IRONMAN: The thrill of victory, the agony of defeat

Daniela Ryf of Switzerland powers out of Hawi at IRONMAN 2016
Yesterday saw the world championship for the IRONMAN triathlon taking place on the Big Island.

In the top photo, Daniela Ryf of Switzerland powers out of Hawi after the turnaround of the cycling leg. Only another 50+ miles of cycling to go, oh and running a marathon. She went on to win the women’s event in 8 hours, 46 minutes, 46 seconds, a new course record.

The events is not all fun and games however. Below, Tim Reed of Australia looks dejected as he walks his bike back into Hawi after withdrawing from the event. Not sure what the reason was, but the bike looked OK.

For more information about IRONMAN, go to Ironman.com.
ironman-2016-tim-reed

Cyclists make the turn at Hawi in the IRONMAN 70.3 Hawaii race on the Big Island.

Get on your bike and ride

Cyclists make the turn at Hawi in the IRONMAN 70.3 Hawaii race on the Big Island.A cyclist make the turn at Hawi in the IRONMAN 70.3 Hawaii race on the Big Island.

Yesterday, IRONMAN 70.3 Hawaii took place on the Big Island. It’s a triathlon featuring a 1.2 mile swim followed by a 56 mile bike ride and topped off with a 13.1 mile run. If all this sounds exhausting, as it does to me, bear in mind that the full IRONMAN race is twice as long.

The world championship for the IRONMAN triathlon also takes place on the Big Island, in October. In both races, the turnaround for the bike leg is at Hawi on the northern tip of the island. For the October race the turnaround is downtown and a decent crowd gathers to cheer on the racers. The 70.3 event makes the turn about a mile out of town. By and large, only race volunteers are there to cheer on the cyclists.

I like to go out to watch both events. They’re colorful and dynamic. Sometimes I get caught up in the euphoria of it all and imagine myself on one of those bikes, leaning into the turn before heading back for the run. But then I go back to my truck and drive home.

For more information about IRONMAN, go to Ironman.com.

A cyclist approaches the turn at Hawi in the IRONMAN 70.3 Hawaii race on the Big Island.The turn at Hawi in the IRONMAN 70.3 Hawaii race on the Big Island.