Green turtle swimming

A green turtle is illuminated while swimming in the waters off the Big Island of Hawaii.

Another post on the theme of ‘Glow,’ this week’s WordPress photo challenge.

I saw this green turtle swimming in clear water while out walking. I like how the late afternoon light causes the turtle’s shell to glow in contrast to its cool, blue environment.

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Pu’u Wa’awa’a goat

A goat stands on the steep sides of Puu Waawaa on the Big Island of Hawaii

The theme of this week’s WordPress photo challenge is ‘Glow,’ so I thought I’d use that as my cue for the week’s posts.

First up is a goat clinging to the precipitous side of Pu’u Wa’awa’a. I particularly like how the goat is looking at me, but casts a crisp, more profiled shadow in the early morning light.

On the downside, there must have been a dozen or so goats in the area and, between their avid grazing and scampering about on the exposed slopes, they contribute greatly to erosion. My time watching them was accompanied by the constant sound of small rocks tumbling down gullies and puffs of dust and dirt churned up by their hooves.

Ironman follow up

Sarah Piampiano of the sweats up the hill toward Hawi.Cyclists duke it out in the Ironman World Championship.Tools of the cyclist's trade on the bike of Mike Blackburn.

Here are more photos from last weekend’s Ironman World Championship race.

Top: Sarah Piampiano of the sweats up the hill toward Hawi.

Above: Tessa Kortekaas, Karen Steurs, and Lisa Tyack duke it out on the way to the cycling turnaround in Hawi.

Above right: Tools of the trade on the bike of Mike Blackburn.

Below right: Christian Godtfredsen zips downhill. Many of the riders would go long distances with their heads down like this. If it were me I would undoubtedly veer off the road into a tree.

Below left: Robert Kenneth and Asbjoern Bakken push uphill and into a headwind.

Bottom: A long line of cyclists straggle up the slope toward Hawi. Around this point the hill eases, but the headwinds picked up.

Robert Kenneth and Asbjoern Bakken push uphill and into a headwind.A long line of cyclists straggle up the slope toward Hawi.

Yellow plume flower

A yellow plume flower (Justicia aurea) at the Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden.

Yellow plume flower (Justicia aurea) hails from Mexico and Central America. This one was at the Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden.

For more information about Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden, go to htbg.com.

 

Signs: Mauna Kea summit

The sign at the trailhead to Mauna Kea summit.

Above: The sign by the start of the trail to Mauna Kea summit.
Below: Two disrespectful people and one more on the way, dwarfed by the scale of the volcano.

People at Mauna Kea summit.

2017 Ironman World Championship

The leaders in the 2017 Ironman World Championship approach Hawi.Bike pedals at 2017 Ironman World Championship.Lionel Sanders competes in the 2017 Ironman World Championship.Bentley Walker competes in the 2017 Ironman World Championship.

Yesterday was the Ironman World Championship race on the island. The race, comprising of a 2 mile swim, a 110 mile bike ride, and a running marathon, starts and ends in Kailua Kona. I usually check in with the race in the vicinity of the bike leg turnaround at Hawi.

Top: The race leaders head up the hill toward the turnaround, accompanied by support vehicles, race marshals, and cameramen.

Above: Lionel Sanders of Canada led the race at this point, but lost the lead before he got back to this spot on the return journey. However, he retook the lead later and only lost it a couple of miles from the marathon finish, to Patrick Lange of Germany.

Right above: Pumping the pedals is hard work, but can be colorful.

Right below: Bentley Walker of the United States digs deep approaching the turnaround at Hawi.

Bottom: Like Sanders, Lucy Charles of Great Britain led the women’s race heading toward Hawi, but she, too, ultimately finished second, behind Daniela Ryf of Switzerland. Charles and Lauren Brandon of the United States were well clear of the rest of the women’s field at this point.

The leaders in the women's race in 2017 Ironman World Championship approach Hawi.

Gargantuan blenny

A Gargantuan Blenny rests on a patch of coralA Gargantuan Blenny rests between rocks.

This week’s WordPress photo challenge is on the theme of scale. The idea is to “experiment with placement and scale to show how big (or small) you can feel in a photo.”

These photos don’t do that. It’s not the image that speaks to scale, it’s the name. I mean, this isn’t a big blenny, or a huge blenny, or even a giant blenny. This is a gargantuan blenny. I feel like I should type the word in all caps – GARGANTUAN – to do it justice.

The photos were taken on different days, but in the same area, and it’s probably the same fish. The bright spots are more numerous toward the front and really catch the light in the photo to the left.

And just how big is this blenny? Typically, they top out at about 7 inches long and this fish was probably about that, but in blenny-world, 7 inches is, well, GARGANTUAN.

Kilauea Iki Crater trail

A group of people, looking very small, walk the trail across Kilauea Iki Craterfloor.A group of people, looking very small, walk the trail across Kilauea Iki Craterfloor.

These views of the trail across Kilauea Iki Crater, taken from the rim of the crater, give some idea of the scale of Kilauea Volcano.

Above, a group of people, looking very small, walk the trail across the crater floor.

To the left, smoke and gases from the active vent in Halema’uma’u Crater can be seen. Halema’uma’u Crater is part of the Kilauea Caldera which is much, much bigger than Kilauea Iki Crater. And, yes, that same group is still visible on the trail in this second photo, along with several others hiking the trail.

For more information about Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, go to nps.gov/havo/. For more information about Kilauea Volcano and it’s eruptions, go to hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea/history/main.html.