Tag Archives: Bromeliad

Vriesea splendens

Bromeliad Vriesea splendens at Hawaii Tropical Bioreserve and Gardens

This week’s Sunday Stills challenge theme is ‘Monthly Color Challenge: Burnt orange or blood orange.’ See more responses here.

Vriesea splendens is a bromeliad with long green leaves strongly marked with dark brown bands. But the show stopper here is the sword-like red-orange inflorescence which can be 2 feet long.

Also posted in response to Becky’s October Squares challenge theme of ‘Past Squares – Flowers.’ See more responses here.

Gecko and bromeliad

The gecko is a gold dust day gecko, originally from Madagascar, and the bromeliad is aechmea blanchetiana, originally from Brazil. I liked this scene for the strong color contrast.

These were seen at Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden. For more information about Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden, go to htbg.com.

Guzmania ‘Limones’

Guzmania 'Limones'

Guzmania ‘Limones’ is a colorful bromeliad with an interesting form. It’s native to Central and South America. Guzmanias only flower once and then die, but the bloom lasts a long time, and before they die, they usually produce pups.

This one was at Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden. For more information about Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden, go to htbg.com.

Guzmania 'Limones' flower

Billbergia nutans

Billbergia nutans

Billbergia nutans detailI took these photos on a recent visit to Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden. The plant looked somewhat familiar to me, but I couldn’t put a name to it. After rummaging through the garden’s plant database, I finally identified it as billbergia nutans. That name sounded even more familiar and a quick check revealed it was a plant I grew in my (tropical) garden in Washington State. There, it was an annual or one to be overwintered indoors. Here, it grows year-round.

Billbergia nutans is native to South America. It’s commonly known as queens tears or friendship plant, the latter because it is an easy plant to split and share. It’s an epiphytic bromeliad, meaning it is shallow rooted and gets most of its moisture and nutrients from the air and from rainfall through the leaves and flowers.

For more information about Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden, go to htbg.com.