Tag Archives: Plumeria

Java sparrows in a plumeria

A pair of java sparrows in a plumeria tree
A pair of java sparrows in a plumeria tree

This pair of Java sparrows was easy to see flitting about in the bare branches of a plumeria tree. Plumerias start out this way before flowers bud and bloom. Leaves are the last to show.

Java sparrows are a favorite of mine, for their perky nature, bold marking, and those pink legs and beak.

Posted in response to Becky’s October Squares challenge theme of ‘Past Squares – In the Pink.’ See more responses here.

The great outdoors

A view of Hualalai from the water
Hualalai from the water.
A sailboat enters Kawaihae Harbor
A sailboat returns to harbor.

This week’s Sunday Stills challenge theme is ‘Great Outdoors.’ See more responses here.

In Hawaii, people spend a great deal of time outdoors. It’s common for people to have an outdoor kitchen, sometimes their only kitchen, sometimes a second one where a barbecue is the featured cooking apparatus. Carports often feature chairs and tables with cars parked elsewhere. The lanai, or deck, is as well-used as any room in the house.

Outdoor activities are popular here, too. Many involve the ocean and its inviting water: swimming, snorkeling, paddling, and of course surfing. Plenty of people go fishing and hunting, longtime sources of food for the table.

For me, experiencing the great outdoors primarily involves hiking and snorkeling. Hiking isn’t especially popular here, especially along the coast where it can get quite hot. I get strange looks when I hike the length of popular beaches togged out in hiking gear, including shoes, hat, and fanny pack loaded with water. For most, the beach is a place for stretching out and broiling in the sun, not actively working up a sweat.

The vast majority of photos on this blog are taken in the great outdoors. These photos are a small selection of things I’ve seen while out and about, from sweeping views to birds and bugs.

A view of Kohala Coast from Koai'a Tree Sanctuary
A view of the south Kohala Coast from Koai’a Tree Sanctuary
View of Mauna Kea from Pu'u Wa'awa'a bench
A view of Mauna Kea from Pu’u Wa’awa’a.

Rainbow yellow

The third of my rainbow colors in response to Becky’s April Squares challenge theme of ‘Bright.’ (See more responses here.)

Today’s rainbow was taken from Kohala Mountain Road and looks down towards the southern edge of Waimea.

In the middle, a bright yellow saffron finch perches on a bare branch of a plumeria. There were zero leaves on this tree and only a few budding flowers, such as the one next to the finch.

And finally, the yellow robe of the painted statue of King Kamehameha I in Kapaau.

Plumeria flowers

Plumeria flowers
Plumeria buds and flowers

This is the time of year, around here, when Plumerias bloom again. They’re one of those trees where the flowers appear before the leaves.

In the top photo, an array of flowers can be seen against the shadow of the tree’s bare branches.

The middle photo shows a mix of buds and blooms.

Below, a closer look at the gorgeous flowers in varying states of unfurling.

Plumeria flowers

Plumeria

This week’s Sunday Stills challenge theme is ‘Sweet.’ See more offerings here.

In my part of the Big Island, plumerias are starting to bloom in their curious way where the flowers appear on the tree before the leaves. In warmer parts of the island, plumeria trees are already thick with flowers and leaves. But in all cases, the flowers are redolent with a sweet perfume.

I like this photo because the blooms in this cluster are at different stages, from the tightly-curled buds at bottom right to the fully-open bloom at top left. But my attention was drawn to the flower unfurling in the center, all shadows and light and dappled with raindrops.

Also posted in response to Bushboys Last Photo for January 2020 challenge. See more responses here.

Plumeria rubra blooms

Plumeria

Plumeria rubra, otherwise known as frangipani, is similar in appearance to plumeria obtusa, otherwise known as Singapore plumeria. But where plumeria obtusa is evergreen, plumeria rubra is deciduous.

This is the time of year when plumeria rubra begins blooming again. The flowers appear before the leaves, starting in January around here. This photo, taken in spring of last year, shows the flowers well established with a few green leaves also showing.